Who Were the Celts? How Did They Save Britain?

I like to think of my ancestry as Celtic as opposed to Roman and Anglo-Saxon. The Celts, it seemed, were not particularly interested in dominating others, not interested in building empires, but were very soulful -- musicians, poets, religious leaders, faeries, story-tellers. The Celts of the British Isles -- the Scottish, the Irish, the Welsh … Continue reading Who Were the Celts? How Did They Save Britain?

Actively Learn: Stimulating Interactive Lessons on Roman & British Empires, US Civil War, General Robert E. Lee, Current Events

Actively Learn, an online learning platform that provides materials at all reading lexile levels and content standards, has made its curricula units free at least for the remainder of the 2019-20 school year. Actively Learn links to resources from all over the web and embeds videos from Youtube.com. Multiple choice questions based on content standards … Continue reading Actively Learn: Stimulating Interactive Lessons on Roman & British Empires, US Civil War, General Robert E. Lee, Current Events

Lincoln At Gettysburg: 269 Words That Changed A Nation

UNUM Ken Burns: "Lincoln felt he had failed the people with his short address, and yet, those 269 words were spoken and all speeches that came thereafter were measured against it." Edward Everett, president of Harvard University, spoke before Lincoln at Gettysburg. He was a leader of the Greek Revival movement in America, proposing that … Continue reading Lincoln At Gettysburg: 269 Words That Changed A Nation

The Roman Wall That Split Britain Into Two Parts, England and Scotland

This wall split England from the more rowdy Picts of Scotland. Smithsonian Channel: Hadrian’s Wall was a 73 mile barrier stretching from coast to coast, splitting the warlike north of Britain from the more docile south. It was the Roman Empire’s way of imposing peace in a hostile land. From the Series: Mystic Britain: Hadrian's … Continue reading The Roman Wall That Split Britain Into Two Parts, England and Scotland

541: First Plague in Recorded History Killed Half the World’s Population

Byzantium, or the Eastern Greco-Roman Empire, lasted for more than a thousand years. Its capital, Constantinople, now Istanbul, Turkey still has remnants of that history. This may seem very far away and like the very distant past to us, but the reign of Justinian the Great (527-565) echoes still. Like the world today, Byzantium was … Continue reading 541: First Plague in Recorded History Killed Half the World’s Population

New Look at Britain Before and After the Romans. Far Stronger and More Developed Than Previously Thought

Sensing that his empire was over-extended and facing insecurity at home, the Roman emperor Constantine III withdrew nearly all of his army from England around 409 A.D. This was a couple of generations before the sacking of Rome in 476 A.D. Roman culture and influence in Britain "dwindled to an almost negligible point," wrote Philip … Continue reading New Look at Britain Before and After the Romans. Far Stronger and More Developed Than Previously Thought

Best Roman Ruins. Where Are the Romans Now?

Throughout Europe and the Middle East, you can find Roman ruins -- more than 40 in Rome, Italy. The 10 best Roman ruins outside Rome that give you a sense of the remarkable geographical span of the Roman Empire are in Merida, Spain; Leptis Magna, Libya; Pula, Croatia; Jerash, Jordan; Caesarea, Israel; Aspendos, Turkey; Baalbek, … Continue reading Best Roman Ruins. Where Are the Romans Now?

In Ancient Europe, the Gauls, AKA the Celts, Barbarians, Lost to the Romans. But Maybe They Were More Civilized?

When I was forced by my parents to take Latin in ninth grade, I perhaps would have been less bored and done better if I had been told that I was descended from the Gauls, aka the Celts, who were frequently referred to in the Roman literature we read in Latin, especially in relation to … Continue reading In Ancient Europe, the Gauls, AKA the Celts, Barbarians, Lost to the Romans. But Maybe They Were More Civilized?

The European, German and Greek Origin of Christmas Traditions

One of my most shocking experiences while living in Turkey -- Asia Minor -- was talking to Muslim students completely unaware of Christmas, not even aware that Saint Nicholas (270-343 A.D.) lived in what is now Turkey during the Roman Empire. Granted, he was not part of their tradition, indeed a cultural icon of Turkey's … Continue reading The European, German and Greek Origin of Christmas Traditions

History of Christmas in the Roman Empire, and Israel Today

"If Joseph and Mary set off from Nazareth to Bethlehem today, they would have to cross 11 Israeli checkpoints, a conflict zone, several security checks, and a 30 foot high wall. They would never have made it." -- Dr. Norman Finkelstein. Bethlehem Nativity Church is the oldest church in the Holy Land still in use. It … Continue reading History of Christmas in the Roman Empire, and Israel Today