Mid-1960s: Economic Expansion, Social Generosity, Tumult

The early 1950s through the early 1970s are generally considered the Age of Affluence, steadily increasing wages and purchasing power for Americans, and a significantly growing middle class, more than 60 percent of Americans, evolving into a national consumer society, sparked in part by the pervasiveness of mass media advertising on radio, television, in newspapers … Continue reading Mid-1960s: Economic Expansion, Social Generosity, Tumult

Civil Rights Movement in American Popular Culture Had Overwhelmingly Positive Impact in 1950s and Early 1960s

"Beginning with the end of the U.S. Civil War in 1865, African Americans toiled to reach equal status in the eyes of the law. Not only that, they also struggled against abuse – both physical and mental – by racist members of society. Starting with the right to vote, and then laboring to integrate schools … Continue reading Civil Rights Movement in American Popular Culture Had Overwhelmingly Positive Impact in 1950s and Early 1960s

Backlash or Whitelash, and Identity Politics

“If you can convince the lowest white man he's better than the best colored man, he won't notice you're picking his pocket. Hell, give him somebody to look down on, and he'll empty his pockets for you.” -- President Lyndon Johnson to Bill Moyers. History of Whitelash or White Identity Politics. Identity Politics Should you vote … Continue reading Backlash or Whitelash, and Identity Politics

When LBJ, the Kennedys, Civil Rights Leaders, Congress and Republicans Joined Together and Acted Heroically

It is so easy to forget that there was a time when Lyndon Johnson, for all his flaws; the Kennedys, for all their flaws; Congress, for all its institutional inertia and perceived corruption, and Republican leaders, for all their flaws, put short-term self-interest aside and acted heroically in the nation's interests, under pressure from heroic … Continue reading When LBJ, the Kennedys, Civil Rights Leaders, Congress and Republicans Joined Together and Acted Heroically

If Lyndon Johnson Did Not Steal the Senatorial Election of 1948…

President Lyndon Johnson's definitive biographer Robert Caro, in his memoir Working: Researching, Interviewing, Writing reveals not only the methods of a premier historian but that Lyndon Johnson stole the senatorial election of 1948 in Texas that ultimately led him to the presidency. Wading through 32 million papers in the LBJ Library in Austin, Caro followed … Continue reading If Lyndon Johnson Did Not Steal the Senatorial Election of 1948…

For Want of Rain On One Afternoon, 1963-4 Could Have Turned Out Far Differently

There probably was no way Republicans could have won the 1964 election. The party was deeply divided over civil rights, and Senator Barry Goldwater lost in a landslide. But Democratic President Lyndon Johnson certainly had his vulnerabilities. In the fall of 1963, a team of journalists for Life magazine were preparing an expose on Johnson's financial shenanigans … Continue reading For Want of Rain On One Afternoon, 1963-4 Could Have Turned Out Far Differently

1960 Election: History Turned On Minuscule Decisions

The 1960 presidential election could easily have turned out differently. Despite Teddy White's bestselling classic, Making of the President 1960, which made John Kennedy's election appear inevitable, like DESTINY, the truth is that JFK won by just one tenth of one percentage point (0.1%), or less than one vote per precinct. It was the closest election of the 20th … Continue reading 1960 Election: History Turned On Minuscule Decisions