‘You Want a Confederate Monument? My Body Is a Confederate Monument’

Caroline Randall Williams, a poet, educator, and a writer in residence at Vanderbilt University, in the NYT asserts that "the black people I come from were owned and raped by the white people I come from. Who dares to tell me to celebrate them?" "I have rape-colored skin. My light-brown-blackness is a living testament to … Continue reading ‘You Want a Confederate Monument? My Body Is a Confederate Monument’

Monuments, Statues and a National Reckoning on Racial Injustice

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i6aQZPK9Bso PBS Newshour: "The debate over physical symbols of the Confederacy has evolved into a broader one about U.S. history. Judy Woodruff talks to Peniel Joseph, professor at the University of Texas at Austin, W. Fitzhugh Brundage, professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Arielle Hudson, one of six students who … Continue reading Monuments, Statues and a National Reckoning on Racial Injustice

Resources from ‘Jim Crow’ Museum Can Be Used to Teach Tolerance

Jim Crow was the period of abject segregation in America from the end of Reconstruction to the mid-1960s, when segregation was finally outlawed through the Civil Rights Act of 1964. It took until the mid-1970s to mostly eliminate legalized segregation. " Ferris State University in Big Rapids, Michigan has a Jim Crow Museum of Racist … Continue reading Resources from ‘Jim Crow’ Museum Can Be Used to Teach Tolerance

Historian John Hope Franklin on the Dire Consequences of Not Learning America’s Racial History

I was privileged to conduct a video interview in 2007 with renowned African American historian John Hope Franklin at the Duke University Center named for him in Durham, NC, just two years before he died at age 94. He was first known for a ground-breaking history of African Americans, From Slavery to Freedom, first published … Continue reading Historian John Hope Franklin on the Dire Consequences of Not Learning America’s Racial History

In 1898, White Supremacists Overthrew NC’s ‘Fusion’ Government of Republicans and Progressives

This appallingly racist cartoon was on the front page of the News and Observer of Raleigh in 1898. Founding Editor Josephus Daniels (1862-1948) was a vehement white supremacist and segregationist,  a leading perpetrator of the 1898 Wilmington insurrection, and an ardent supporter of the Southern Democratic Party before the historic party realignment that began to … Continue reading In 1898, White Supremacists Overthrew NC’s ‘Fusion’ Government of Republicans and Progressives

The Massacre of Tulsa in 1921, OK’s Black Wall Street Echoes, May Finally Be Reckoned With

As President Trump kicks off his re-election campaign in Tulsa, OK today, there have been several media reports on the sad but buried history of Oklahoma, particularly a focus on the racist-led massacre of black businesses in June, 1921, along with the Trail of Tears perpetuated on Native Americans. BBC: City Faces Up to Its … Continue reading The Massacre of Tulsa in 1921, OK’s Black Wall Street Echoes, May Finally Be Reckoned With

‘The Difference Between Us’: The Illusion of Race

"Everyone can tell a Nubian from a Norwegian, so why not divide people into different races? That's the question explored in "The Difference Between Us," the first hour of this PBS series. This episode shows that despite what we've always believed, the world's peoples simply don't come bundled into distinct biological groups. We begin by … Continue reading ‘The Difference Between Us’: The Illusion of Race

The Stories We Tell Ourselves About Race

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdndfCPuJfU The second episode of the PBS documentary, "Race: The Power of an Illusion: The Stories We Tell" starts with this question: "It's true that race has always been with us, right?" "Wrong. Ancient peoples stigmatized "others" on the grounds of language, custom, class, and especially religion, but they did not sort people according to physical … Continue reading The Stories We Tell Ourselves About Race

Race: the Power of An Illusion, Especially in Housing

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHlKwWp50IM "If race doesn't exist biologically, what is it? And why should it matter?" asks "The House We Live In," an episode in the PBS film series on race in America, "The Power of an Illusion." It focuses "not on individual attitudes and behavior but on the ways our institutions and policies advantage some groups … Continue reading Race: the Power of An Illusion, Especially in Housing

‘Slavery By Another Name’: PBS Documentary Challenged Assumptions About When Slavery and Legal Discrimination Ended

When my future brother-in-law from New Jersey visited the semi-rural North Carolina community where my family lived in the mid-1960s, he was shocked. "They still have slaves!" he later recalled. True, "the help" and those working in the cotton fields and on the farms were not slaves. They were paid $25 or $30 a week … Continue reading ‘Slavery By Another Name’: PBS Documentary Challenged Assumptions About When Slavery and Legal Discrimination Ended