Monuments, Statues and a National Reckoning on Racial Injustice

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i6aQZPK9Bso PBS Newshour: "The debate over physical symbols of the Confederacy has evolved into a broader one about U.S. history. Judy Woodruff talks to Peniel Joseph, professor at the University of Texas at Austin, W. Fitzhugh Brundage, professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Arielle Hudson, one of six students who … Continue reading Monuments, Statues and a National Reckoning on Racial Injustice

Moments When Time Stands Still and History Changes Dramatically: Just Before Pickett’s Charge at Gettysburg, 1863

For students of history of almost every generation, there are moments when time stands still, to be relived over and over: what if the central characters had acted differently? What if Gavrilo Princip¬†did not successfully murder Archduke Franz Ferdinand and set off WWI?¬†What if it was raining (as predicted) and the roof went up on … Continue reading Moments When Time Stands Still and History Changes Dramatically: Just Before Pickett’s Charge at Gettysburg, 1863

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg Makes Legal and Women’s History

A movie documentary and a docudrama (with actors) illustrate the remarkable life of "RBG" or Ruth Bader Ginsberg, available on Youtube as well as various streaming services. "At the age of 85, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has developed a lengthy legal legacy while becoming an unexpected pop culture icon. But the unique … Continue reading Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg Makes Legal and Women’s History

Lessons the 1918 Flu Pandemic Can Teach to the 2020s

Former Washington Post reporter John Barry spent seven years writing a book about the 1918 flu pandemic. Many times he wanted to quit because the topic seemed irrelevant. It was published in 2004 with minimal publicity, to mediocre reviews. But now The Great Influenza: The Epic Story of the Deadliest Plague in History is a … Continue reading Lessons the 1918 Flu Pandemic Can Teach to the 2020s

Covid-19 Ushers in New Era, So Far Characterized By Bipartisan Cooperation

One way of looking at the speed with which Congress and President Trump overwhelmingly approved the $2 trillion stimulus package to address the corona-virus crisis is that the times demanded bipartisanship, and Congress proved itself up to the challenge. The Senate voted 96 to 0 and the House voted by voice acclamation to approve the … Continue reading Covid-19 Ushers in New Era, So Far Characterized By Bipartisan Cooperation

Historian Timothy Snyder, ‘On Tyranny’: Two Years After His Book Was Published, The Threat Is Greater

In response to ominous events in Ukraine, Russia, Britain, Eastern Europe and the United States, Yale University Historian Timothy Snyder published On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the 20th Century, in early 2017. He is now speaking out that the world is in even greater risk of losing its democracies and embracing authoritarian if not tyrannical … Continue reading Historian Timothy Snyder, ‘On Tyranny’: Two Years After His Book Was Published, The Threat Is Greater

Brexit: Most Consequential Shift So Far of 2020s’ Decade

One of the most consequential decisions of the 2020s may have occurred in the decade's first month: the decision of England to leave the European Union. Or Brexit. Notice I did not say the decision of the United Kingdom to leave the EU -- it is still uncertain what Scotland and Northern Ireland will do, … Continue reading Brexit: Most Consequential Shift So Far of 2020s’ Decade

In Era of Trump, Renewed Interest in President Andrew Johnson and His 1868 Impeachment

With impeachment in the news, visitors are crowding to the east Tennessee home and museum of President Andrew Johnson, NPR reports. He was temperamentally erratic, vain, vulgar, vindictive, defiant, the first president to be impeached, served as president after Abraham Lincoln's assassination in April 1865 until March 1869 (never winning a popular election). He was … Continue reading In Era of Trump, Renewed Interest in President Andrew Johnson and His 1868 Impeachment

Predictions For the 2020s, Or for 2030

What will the world look like in 2030? The NYT asked 13 public figures to speculate. Obvious answers that even I could predict would be: cyber-terrorists, holding cities hostage. an end to fact-based, shared reality. more global warming, an increase in weather-related disasters, casualties and costs. more renewable energy, awareness of carbon footprints, taxes and … Continue reading Predictions For the 2020s, Or for 2030

Does Impeachment History Provide Guide for Future? Yes and No

In assessing the impeachment and Senate trial of President Trump, many observers mainly remember the impeachment of President Clinton, which backfired politically against Republicans in the short-term. They lost congressional seats in the 1998 midterms. But impeaching Clinton helped them win the extremely close presidential election of 2000, George W. Bush against Clinton's vice president, … Continue reading Does Impeachment History Provide Guide for Future? Yes and No