Early Anglo-Saxon Kings and Queens of England Were Originally Part of Germanic Tribes

Lindsay Holiday tells the story of the early Anglo-Saxons in Britain between 450 and 1066 A.D. The Saxons were originally Germanic tribes who migrated from Saxony and other parts of the European continent and developed the English language -- at least half the words in the language were originally Anglo-Saxon words. She asks and answers … Continue reading Early Anglo-Saxon Kings and Queens of England Were Originally Part of Germanic Tribes

Who Were the Celts? How Did They Save Britain?

I like to think of my ancestry as Celtic as opposed to Roman and Anglo-Saxon. The Celts, it seemed, were not particularly interested in dominating others, not interested in building empires, but were very soulful -- musicians, poets, religious leaders, faeries, story-tellers. The Celts of the British Isles -- the Scottish, the Irish, the Welsh … Continue reading Who Were the Celts? How Did They Save Britain?

New Look at Britain Before and After the Romans. Far Stronger and More Developed Than Previously Thought

Sensing that his empire was over-extended and facing insecurity at home, the Roman emperor Constantine III withdrew nearly all of his army from England around 409 A.D. This was a couple of generations before the sacking of Rome in 476 A.D. Roman culture and influence in Britain "dwindled to an almost negligible point," wrote Philip … Continue reading New Look at Britain Before and After the Romans. Far Stronger and More Developed Than Previously Thought

Iran’s Dramatic History Shapes Current Events

In light of international crises involving Iran, History Today, a monthly magazine based in London, zooms out over centuries and offers readers access to its archived articles on Iranian history. Among them: Return of the Ayatollah: Iran’s Islamic Revolution Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini became a lightning rod for the mass protests which overthrew the shah of Iran in 1979, … Continue reading Iran’s Dramatic History Shapes Current Events

Byzantium: Greco-Roman Eastern Empire for 1100 Years, Was Lost 560 Years Ago, But Traces Remain

Traces of Byzantium, the Greco-Roman Eastern Empire that dominated for a thousand years, can still be found in Turkey, Eastern Europe and the Middle East, as this documentary illustrates. It was overtaken by the Ottoman Empire in 1453. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byzantin...//Empire, from 395–1453 A.D. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_...Emperors. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byzantin...Architecture. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_...Orthodox Church.

What if the Walls of Constantinople Were Breached Badly?

If the Walls of Constantinople were breached in 447 AD by Attila the Hun, would I be a Christian today? Photo from Today's Zaman, Turkish newspaper, 2010. We in the West think of choosing religions almost completely as a personal choice — a decision one makes to believe or disbelieve. And yet, history and culture … Continue reading What if the Walls of Constantinople Were Breached Badly?

Killing Masses of Humans: Disease, Drought, Famine and Climate Change Can Result in End of Civilizations

Disease, or epidemics, may have been one reason the Roman Empire fell in the 400s. It (specifically small pox) certainly was the main reason for wiping out 90 percent of the Native American population of North American before 1800. In the above Crash Course video, "John Green teaches you about disease, and the effects that … Continue reading Killing Masses of Humans: Disease, Drought, Famine and Climate Change Can Result in End of Civilizations

Notre Dame Is Integral to French and European History

Candida Moss, the Edward Cadbury professor of theology at Britain's University of Birmingham, joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss the fire damage to the Notre Dame Cathedral, the "beating heart" of Catholicism in France. NYT: What the Notre Dame Fire Reveals About the Soul of France."France, a fundamentally Roman Catholic country whose citizens rarely attend … Continue reading Notre Dame Is Integral to French and European History

2500 BC to Today: Comparing, Contrasting Ancient and Modern Empires

After visiting ancient ruins and monuments in Turkey, Greece, Italy, Egypt, Jordan, and Israel, feeling that I time-traveled back thousands of years, I have often imagined what it would be like to time travel 2000 or 4000 years from now visiting ruins of the modern era. I imagine that if the future involves catastrophic man-made … Continue reading 2500 BC to Today: Comparing, Contrasting Ancient and Modern Empires

0 to 500 AD: Ancient Empires. 9 Short What If Videos

Studying ancient empires and discovering their relevance for today is not an easy task. Cody Franklin’s "What if" video series does a pretty good job of making them relevant by speculating on how the world might have changed if the victors were different, or if, for example, the Roman Empire never fell. Ancient History What … Continue reading 0 to 500 AD: Ancient Empires. 9 Short What If Videos