Horrifying Black Death, or the Plague Wiped Out A Third of Europe’s Population in the 1300s

History and Cosmos: "In the 14th century the Black Death was an unprecedented human disaster. In 3 dreadful years over one third of Europe's population was wiped out. This documentary examines the spread of the plague; its effects on medicine, religion; society at the time. Some people believe it was sent by God to punish … Continue reading Horrifying Black Death, or the Plague Wiped Out A Third of Europe’s Population in the 1300s

Did Pope Gregory’s Order to Kill Cats Set Off the Bubonic Plague?

A popular myth is that Pope Gregory IX in the 1200s had a phobia against cats, issued an edict or papal bull ordering all the cats in Europe to be slaughtered. That eventually caused the bubonic plague, the theory goes, because the deaths of cats caused an infestation of rats, who brought disease and epidemics. … Continue reading Did Pope Gregory’s Order to Kill Cats Set Off the Bubonic Plague?

Introducing the Renaissance (1300s-1500s) and Humanism

During the European Renaissance (1300-1600), the intellectual movement of humanism emerged. History teacher Paul Sargent defines the Renaissance, describes the movement of humanism and profiles four major figures of the movement: Petrarch (1304-1374), Lorenzo Valla (1407-1457), Marsilio Ficino (1433-1499), and Pico della Mirandola (1463-1494). Sargent points out that during the Renaissance, citizens renewed their belief … Continue reading Introducing the Renaissance (1300s-1500s) and Humanism

Byzantium: Greco-Roman Eastern Empire for 1100 Years, Was Lost 560 Years Ago, But Traces Remain

Traces of Byzantium, the Greco-Roman Eastern Empire that dominated for a thousand years, can still be found in Turkey, Eastern Europe and the Middle East, as this documentary illustrates. It was overtaken by the Ottoman Empire in 1453. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byzantin...//Empire, from 395–1453 A.D. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_...Emperors. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byzantin...Architecture. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_...Orthodox Church.

Why You’d Never Survive Life in the Middle Ages

Grunge: "If you believe what Hollywood tells you, then life during the Middle Ages might seem romantic and glamorous - chock-full of noble knights on noble steeds, beautiful ladies with pointy hats, chivalry, honor, and, if you're lucky, a dragon or two. "Sadly, the truth is that life in the Middle Ages was about as … Continue reading Why You’d Never Survive Life in the Middle Ages

Ottoman Empire Loomed Large Over Europe, Asia and Africa for Nearly 500 Years

In this Crash Course episode, John Green did something I disagree with, pairing or maybe even equating the significance of the little city-state of Venice with the massive Ottoman Empire, which at its peak spanned all the way from the edges of Vienna in northern Europe to Arabia to North Africa. This is a Eurocentric interpretation of … Continue reading Ottoman Empire Loomed Large Over Europe, Asia and Africa for Nearly 500 Years

Killing Masses of Humans: Disease, Drought, Famine and Climate Change Can Result in End of Civilizations

Disease, or epidemics, may have been one reason the Roman Empire fell in the 400s. It (specifically small pox) certainly was the main reason for wiping out 90 percent of the Native American population of North American before 1800. In the above Crash Course video, "John Green teaches you about disease, and the effects that … Continue reading Killing Masses of Humans: Disease, Drought, Famine and Climate Change Can Result in End of Civilizations

The Renaissance: An Introduction, Florence, and the North, from Crash Course

The Renaissance: Was It a Thing? Crash Course World History #22 "In which John Green teaches you about the European Renaissance. European learning changed the world in the 15th and 16th century, but was it a cultural revolution, or an evolution? We'd argue that any cultural shift that occurs over a couple of hundred years … Continue reading The Renaissance: An Introduction, Florence, and the North, from Crash Course

Abolitionist Movement Started in 1300s; Progressed Slowly; Slavery Is Still Not Eradicated

The abolitionist movement against slavery began far earlier than I was taught in American history class. The most memorable example of it was the Underground Railroad during the early to mid-1800s. But abolitionism as a moral philosophy began with King Louis X of France, who abolished slavery in France way back in 1315. King Charles … Continue reading Abolitionist Movement Started in 1300s; Progressed Slowly; Slavery Is Still Not Eradicated

Little Ice Age from the 1300s to 1800s Disrupted Lives, Cultures, Histories

Contemporary climate change is not the first in human history, as John Green explains in this Crash Course lecture. The "little ice age" was a period of cooling that occurred after the Medieval Warm Period. Although it was not a true ice age, the term was introduced into scientific literature by François E. Matthes in … Continue reading Little Ice Age from the 1300s to 1800s Disrupted Lives, Cultures, Histories