At NC’s ‘Battle of Moore’s Creek Bridge’ Scottish Immigrants Defended British Against Rebels

  https://youtu.be/wHruuocdBdI This student documentary was a 2012 Florida History Fair Top 10 Finalist (Jr. Documentary). It is entitled "The American Revolution - Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge" about a battle led by Scottish immigrants to North Carolina near Wilmington, N.C. as they defended the British against the rebels in February 1776. It won honors: … Continue reading At NC’s ‘Battle of Moore’s Creek Bridge’ Scottish Immigrants Defended British Against Rebels

NYT’s 1619 Project Riles Mainstream Historians As Ideological Framing and Misleading Interpretation

"Academic historians, conservatives, and Trotskyist socialists rightly reject The New York Times’ reframing of the past," reported Conor Friedersdorf in The Atlantic, in a compilation of serious criticisms of the 1619 Project. The Atlantic's Adam Serwer was equally acerbic. "The fight over the 1619 Project is not about the facts. A dispute between a small group … Continue reading NYT’s 1619 Project Riles Mainstream Historians As Ideological Framing and Misleading Interpretation

British and American Life in the 1700s, As Revealed in Family Lore from Supreme Court Justice James Iredell

In my last post on the Edenton, NC Tea Party organized by women, I mentioned that Arthur Iredell sarcastically wrote his brother James Iredell, who would later become one of the first US Supreme Court justices, how unimpressed he was that men like Jamie had been so weak as to allow the ladies of the … Continue reading British and American Life in the 1700s, As Revealed in Family Lore from Supreme Court Justice James Iredell

NC Women Organized Edenton Tea Party To Show Solidarity With Boston; British Mocked Them

This cartoon from the British press in 1775 mocked colonial women in the North Carolina town of Edenton for holding a party and signing a resolution boycotting British tea. They were inspired by the Boston Tea Party of 1773. What was unusual about the Edenton Tea Party was not the boycott, but that it was … Continue reading NC Women Organized Edenton Tea Party To Show Solidarity With Boston; British Mocked Them

Now Part of Popular ‘Outlander’ TV Series: NC’s Regulator Rebellion, Battle of Alamance

North Carolina was the setting for a significant prelude to the American Revolution, and has now gotten star treatment in the popular time-traveling TV series "Outlander." The Fraser family and their associates become embroiled in the Regulator movement, a rebellion of farmers upset over high British taxes in the Carolina colony. The rebellion, which some … Continue reading Now Part of Popular ‘Outlander’ TV Series: NC’s Regulator Rebellion, Battle of Alamance

Sons of Liberty Dump Tea into Boston Harbor

Sons of Liberty and Boston Tea Party. Before the Revolutionary War, American colonists were taxed heavily for importing tea from Britain. The colonists, not fans of "taxation without representation", reacted by dumping tea into the Boston Harbor, a night now known as the Boston Tea Party. Ben Labaree gets into the nitty-gritty of that famous … Continue reading Sons of Liberty Dump Tea into Boston Harbor

King George III’s Proclamation of 1763 and Announcements of Taxes in Colonies

George III was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until the union of the two countries on 1 January 1801, after which he was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death in 1820. He was king of the American colonies until the Declaration of … Continue reading King George III’s Proclamation of 1763 and Announcements of Taxes in Colonies

Shot Heard Round the World

History.com: An essay by Elizabeth Nix on the "Shot heard round the world." It refers to the opening shot of the Battle of Concord, Massachusetts in 1775, which began the American Revolutionary War. The American Revolution did not just suddenly begin with the Battles of Lexington and Concord. There were earlier confrontations between the American … Continue reading Shot Heard Round the World

Americans: Subjects or Citizens?

In drafting the Declaration of Independence, 32-year-old Thomas Jefferson struggled for the proper word to describe the American public. He first called them "our fellow subjects" and then changed the word to "citizens," digital technology has revealed. The Library of Congress, employing hyperspectral imaging from a high-resolution digital camera to the original draft of the … Continue reading Americans: Subjects or Citizens?